This is my academic blog, on which I discuss topics of a more advanced nature that are pertinent to the often difficult task of doing classical Christian education in our very much un-classical age.


Latest Blog Posts

Latest Blog Posts

  • Tolkien’s Christian Detractors
    [NOTE: This short essay assumes as important context the several introductory articles for this section of the site, most especially The Imagination: Pitfalls and Prospects.] In my experience as a long-time reader of Tolkien, objections to his work come in […]
  • Genesis 1 Compared with the Ainulindalë and Valaquenta
    As noted in the brief opening for this section of the page, Tolkien has many Christian detractors. These may be divided into two broad classes: those who object to his mythology on the basis of special revelation and those who […]
  • Tolkien’s Idea of “Subcreation”
    A key concept operating in Tolkien’s works is that of subcreation. For some years I have found persuasive almost to the degree of self-evidency this explanation and defense of Christian imaginative writing. My high degree of confidence has come in […]
  • General Revelation: An Indispensable Christian Category!
    A faithful use of the imagination by Christians must begin with recognizing and upholding the historic theological distinction between two types of God’s revelation: special and general. Many Christians today seem to recognize only one type, special, (which they often […]
  • The Imagination: Pitfalls and Prospects
    As will often be noted in the materials found here, many Christians harbor great suspicions about the imagination. Their suspicions, expressed in a variety of ways both vulgar and sophisticated, cluster around two of the most important theological truths of […]
  • “As they come to be, so will they teach”
    A peculiar, and not easily spotted, danger that classical Christian teachers face is what Eric Voegelin called “immanentizing the eschaton.” This is just a fancy way of noting how idealists (and aren’t we in the classical education world all idealists […]
  • Notes on “the Secular” (6): What About Secular*ism*??
    In the previous five posts of this series, I’ve made a case for why classical educators ought not to treat the secular domain as malum in se, and so ought not to use the “secular” word family as either connative […]
  • Notes on “the Secular” (5): Nothing is Evil in Itself
    Having spent four posts now defining and examining the dichotomous Sacred Vs. Secular interpretation of reality which I have dubbed “totalizing dualism,” I’ve stated several times that it is incompatible with classical education. In my last two posts for this […]
  • Notes on “the Secular” (4): Extremes are Not Virtuous
    In the first post, second post, and third post of this series, I defined and briefly examined the problem of what I call totalizing dualism in Christian thinking today about the word “secular” and its derivatives. If you are arriving […]