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Monthly Archives: April 2020

Which Comes First – Truth, or the Church?

I had occasion some years ago while writing a large paper on Medieval resistance theory to read portions of Dante’s Monarchia, a vigorously logical treatise defending the idea, contrary to the spirit of the times, that temporal rulership is not derived from the decree of the pope, but directly from Christ.  I wanted to share the […]

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The Real RINO – A “Republic in Name Only”

Augustine cites Cicero on the destruction of the Roman Republic due to the decline of traditional morality: …the great leaders could not have founded, or could not have so long maintained such a great state with such a vast stretch of empire, had there not been that morality in the community; nor could the morality […]

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Ambitious Men, Deformed Actions

Many politicians are “…ambitious men, whose minds, doting on glory, which is a mere image of virtue, produce nothing that is genuine or uniform, but only, as might be expected of such a conjunction, deformed and unnatural actions…” Such men eventually come to the following end: “when this passion is exorbitant, it is dangerous in […]

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Don’t Have It If You Don’t Need It

“For as a body bred to a good habit requires nothing exquisite either in clothes or food, so a sound man and a sound household keep themselves up with small quantities. Riches ought to be proportioned to the use we have of them. He that scrapes together a great deal, making use of but little, […]

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When Bad People Have Good Things

For the things that the mass of people say are good are not correctly so described. It is said that the the best thing is health, and the second is beauty, and third is wealth – and then are said to be ten thousand other goods: sharp sight, hearing, and good perception of all the […]

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Internet Politics: “Carried Away by the Flood”

When many of them are sitting together in assemblies, courts, theaters, army camps, or in some other public gathering of the crowd, they object very loudly and excessively to some of the things that are said or done and approve others in the same way, shouting and clapping, so that the very rocks and surroundings […]

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“The History of the Church for 1500 Years Is, To a Large Extent, Just the History of Popery” – NOT!

William Cunningham (1805 1861) was a nineteenth century Scottish polemical theologian who, like many in his day, promoted the anachronistic notion that Calvinism has always been the confession of True and Pure Christianity. Also like many in his day, he liked to stoke the excessive antipathy toward “Romanism” and “Popery” that was harbored by many […]

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Worthless Books

In line with his Stoic principle that “excess in any sphere is reprehensible,” Seneca (ca. 4 B.C. to 65 A.D.) has this to say about having too large a library: Even in our studies, where expenditure is most worth while, it justification depends on its moderation. What is the point of having countless books and […]

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The Liberating Knowledge of Letters

Here’s a snippet from a letter about the educated man, written ca. 1160 A.D.: …it is the knowlege of letters that leads one forth from the common ignorance of human beings and from the stolid torpor that characterizes the dull-witted, and renders to its pupil glorious liberty. And so the pagans rightly called the art […]

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