Sound Familiar?

“…So Numa forbade the Romans to represent God in the form of man or beast, nor was there any painted or graven image of a deity admitted amongst them for the space of the first hundred and seventy years, all of which time their temples and chapels were kept free and pure from images; to such baser objects they deemed it impious to liken the highest, and all access to God impossible, except by the pure act of the intellect.” [Plutarch, "Numa Pompilius," in Plutarch's Lives, Vol. 1, trans. John Dryden (New York: Barnes and Noble, 2006), pg. 97.]

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