Category Archives: Writing History

Notes on the Traditional Roman Account of Roman History

The traditional account of Roman history to the third century B.C. exhibits different standards of historiography than does our own, and carries different historical importance. In what follows I will discuss three major factors which informed and shaped the traditional … Continue reading

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Historiographical Methods and Biblical Christology (III): A Theological History of Jesus

[Continued from Part II] Father Roch continues his historiographical reflections by building on his general principles the conclusion that the “we have found a rationale in the very nature of historiography for going beyond mere history and attempting to inquire … Continue reading

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Historiographical Methods and Biblical Christology (II): General Principles

[Continued from Part I] Father Kereszty (hereafter “Father Roch,” since that what most students in the Christology class call him), outlines his general historiographical method for analyzing the historical Jesus as follows.:”(Source: Jesus Christ: Fundamentals of Christology.:”(New York: Society of … Continue reading

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Historiographical Methods and Biblical Christology (I)

A second reading assigned in my Christology class is Roch A. Kereszty’s Jesus Christ: Fundamentals of Christology.:”(New York: Society of St. Paul, 2002.)”: This is turning out to be quite a thought-provoking book, not least of which because Father Kereszty … Continue reading

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Moment of Transition

Monika Otter’s article “1066: The Moment of Transition in Two Narratives of the Norman Conquest”:”(Speculum, Vol. 74, No. 3. (Jul., 1999), pp. 565-586.)”: explores the question of how Medieval historians dealt with novelty and change. Otter writes of “the widely … Continue reading

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“Foreign Patrimony”

William of Malmesbury has an interesting take on the common Medieval practice of spicing up Saints’ Lives with effusive praise modeled after ancient canons of rhetoric: “…anyone who tries to exalt verbally what is in itself of great importance wastes … Continue reading

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“Compendia Dispendia,” and Other Problems With Church History Writing

Richard Chenevix Trench, a late 19th century Archbishop of Dublin, observed two common problems with Church histories: (1) they are so focused on details that the reader “cannot see the city for the houses,” and (2) they are so broad … Continue reading

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“Setting Our Minds to the Track” (II): Some Additional Considerations For An Alternative Protestant Interpretation of Church History

From time to time readers hailing from several traditions have made comments about this site which seem to misunderstand what I am doing here. Some Catholic readers, for instance, take posts I make about the history of the papacy to … Continue reading

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Truth of History Vs. Reason of State

It has often been a staple of Protestant apologetics to assert that Rome “doesn’t like the truth,” and to back this up by an appeal to all the history that Rome has supposedly “covered up” because it’s too embarassing. Many … Continue reading

Posted in 19th Century, Reforming Apologetics, Writing History | 10 Comments

On the Development of Protestant Historiography (Part III)

In the first two posts on this topic (here and here) I summarized Euan Cameron’s discussion of the post-16th century development of Protestant historiography. Some additional details, and several other important historians, are discussed in James E. Bradley’s and Richard … Continue reading

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