Category Archives: Van Tillianism

Van Til’s Presuppositionalism, Part II: The Ontological Foundation of Reality and Thought

Part 1 of this series stated that a major theme of Van Tillian presuppositionalism is that there is no neutrality, no autonomy, under God. In this part, I want to unpack an implication of this denial of autonomy – namely, … Continue reading

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Van Til as A “Reverse-Kantian”

John Frame helpfully explains the Kantian starting point of Van Til’s apologetic system, namely, a reversal of Kant’s identification of the necessary preconditions (or, presuppositions) of human rationality: If Kant taught the world of secular unbelief the essentials of its … Continue reading

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Van Til’s Presuppositionalism, Part I: The Antithesis and Its Sociological Implications

The posts in this series are based on outlines I originally wrote about four years ago to try to explain to some Catholic friends some of the epistemological sloganeering, philosophical ignorance, and nearly fideistic affirmations about “Truth” that they frequently … Continue reading

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On Van Til’s Pedagogy and “Movement” Van Tillianism

In his illuminating book Cornelius Van Til: An Analysis of His Thought (Phillipsburg, NJ: Presbyterian and Reformed, 1995), John Frame has some interesting remarks on Cornelius Van Til’s pedagogical problems and how they have played into serious distortions of his … Continue reading

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A One Way Bridge Between Hellenism and Christianity

I found these quotes from G.W.H. Lampe a few years ago, and just rediscovered them in a file today. Very interesting stuff in light of a certain popular Reformed polemic against “Greek thinking.” …To persuade thinking pagans that their own … Continue reading

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Scholastic Presuppositionalism

It has long seemed to me that the supposed stark divide posited in some Reformed circles between “classical” and “presuppositional” apologetics is an oversimplification. If a presuppositional apologetic is one which exposits the transcendental conditions necessary for finite existence, then … Continue reading

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Tertullian’s Ghost

Let me preface this entry by saying that what I’m doing here is more like thinking out loud than like lecturing or pontificating. If any of the following content offends you, please re-read this opening paragraph. I’ve been Reformed for … Continue reading

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