Category Archives: Nominalism and Realism

Observations Concerning Wycliffe And “Sola” Scriptura

Henning Graf Reventlow cites a number of recent studies of Wycliffe in his own context which seem to indicate that placing Wycliffe in the hagiographical position of “the Morning Star of the Reformation” and imagining that his view of Scriptura … Continue reading

Posted in 14th Century, Nominalism and Realism | Leave a comment

The Reformed Scripture Principle: Platonic Nominalism?

[Continuing notes on Karl Barth, The Theology of the Reformed Confessions, trans. Darrell L. Guder and Judith J. Guder (Louisville and London: Westminster John Knox Press, 2002)] After describing the difference between the Reformed and Lutheran churches as consisting in … Continue reading

Posted in Nominalism and Realism | Leave a comment

Going Between Nominalism and Realism?

Leithart on Voluntarism, Intellectualism, and Creation. This is interesting. I’ve always suspected there is a third way to think about things than just forms of nominalism or realism. Leithart’s post suggests just such an alternative. Worth exploring.

Posted in Nominalism and Realism | Leave a comment

Calvin and Nominalism

As some readers may know, for several years I’ve been interested in the long-running tension in Christian theology between nominalism and realism. I used to have a few “papers” on the subject up on this site, the fruits of my … Continue reading

Posted in 16th Century, Nominalism and Realism | Leave a comment

Miscellanies on 14th and 15th Century Nominalism

A while back I read Francis Oakley’s extremely thorough work The Political Thought of Pierre d’Ailly: The Voluntarist Tradition, which outlined copiously from d’Ailly’s own works the “nominalism” of this great 15th century churchman. So much about the state of … Continue reading

Posted in 14th Century, 15th Century, Nominalism and Realism | Comments Off

Martin Luther: “Sum Enim Occanicae Factionis”

Many moons ago, while doing my preliminary research on the question of nominalism, I ran across a notation somewhere that Luther had described William of Ockham as “magister meus” (”my teacher”. I have not been able to find that statement … Continue reading

Posted in 16th Century, Faith and Reason, Nominalism and Realism | Comments Off