Category Archives: Council of Trent

“Discerning the More Fruitful Paths to Reform”

“Piercing the layered veils of historical understanding involves a return to the sources with questions and categories beyond those available at the time under study.” With this provocative line begins Joseph W. Koterski’s article “Discerning the More Fruitful Paths to … Continue reading

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“A Victim of An Age…Over Which He Had No Control”

A brief follow-up to my post Fear, Honor, and Interest and the Records of the Council of Trent:Chadwick summarizes the intense struggle of the period 1868-1874 of the Vatican archivist Augustin Theiner to get the archives of the Council of … Continue reading

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“Fear, Honor, and Interest” and the Records of the Council of Trent

In his account of the Peloponnesian War, the great historian Thucydides, chronicling the vast fratricidal follies of the Greeks, wrote that one big cause of the War was the simply human emotional and psychological triad of “fear, honor, and interest.”[1] … Continue reading

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The Changing Historiography of the Council of Trent And Some of Its Real-World Effects

Giuseppe Alberigo’s informative article “The Council of Trent: New Views on Its Fourth Centennary”[1] opens by noting that unlike all previous councils the Council of Trent has remained “an active and operative factor, absolutely decisive in many aspects of the … Continue reading

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Part III: Giovanni Pietro Caraffa, a.k.a. Pope Paul IV (1476-1559)

In conclusion: A question that may arise from the previous two posts on this subject is why it is so important for Protestants to understand that this pope, Paul IV, was such a fanatical hothead. After all, isn’t what really … Continue reading

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Part II: Giovanni Pietro Carafa, a.k.a. Pope Paul IV (1476-1559)

As I mentioned yesterday, here are the passages I’ve transcribed from the Catholic scholar Ludwig von Pastor regarding Giovanni Pietro Carafa, who reigned as Pope Paul IV from 1555-1559. This man, and others like him, are among the reasons why … Continue reading

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Part I: Giovanni Pietro Carafa, a.k.a. Pope Paul IV (1476-1559)

It’s interesting that at many of the most critical points of Church history absolutely fanatical men are found right at the center of things. I can’t decide whether a Great Moment is defined as such by the presence of such … Continue reading

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Of “Rebels” Against “Authority”

On a message board someone (I think perhaps a Catholic–it’s not really clear what his orientation is) has been trying to argue that the Reformation was a simple case of “revolt” against “authority”–a simple case of proto-Modernist zealots bravely standing … Continue reading

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On the Council of Trent (I)

I’ve been looking at the Council of Trent (as time allows) for a few months, working on understanding it in its natural context, the 150-year long attempt of reforming elements within the Church to overcome the oppressive, entrenched corruption of … Continue reading

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Concilii Tridentini eviscerator

Medieval guys often had cool Latin descriptions appended to their names, and the trend continued at least as far as the late 16th century-early 17th century historian Paolo Sarpi, whose work I recently discovered mentioned in a journal article, and … Continue reading

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