Category Archives: Conciliar Theory & Practice

John Luke on Deposing a Heretical Pope

Medieval theologians and canon lawyers took it for granted that the pope could be deposed for any “grave sin” against the Church, and that fomenting or prolonging schism was a grave sin tantamount to teaching heresy. In a sermon given … Continue reading

Posted in 15th Century, Conciliar Theory & Practice | Leave a comment

William Durandus the Younger (VIII)

The Gregorian revolution of the eleventh century had been premised largely on the urgent need to eliminate simony, such an abominable evil that Pope Gregory VII had believed the Church to be on the verge of absolute ruin and destruction … Continue reading

Posted in 14th Century, Conciliar Theory & Practice | Leave a comment

William Durandus the Younger (VII)

William introduces his argument that the papacy, apparently unaccountable to anyone on the existing terms of canon law, is accountable to a General Council this way: In Proverbs 11 it is written: where there are many counsels, there is salvation. … Continue reading

Posted in 14th Century, Conciliar Theory & Practice | Leave a comment

William Durandus the Younger (VI)

In part 5 of these notes I cited Constantin Fasolt’s observation that William appeared to write himself into a corner in arguing that reform must take place on the basis of the law, as if the meaning of the law … Continue reading

Posted in 14th Century, Conciliar Theory & Practice | Leave a comment

William Durandus the Younger (V)

Like most Medieval authors, William Durandus the Younger’s concern was to be found at one with the authorities (auctoritates), to say nothing new or original in terms of principles, but to merely allow the ancient, received truth to speak through … Continue reading

Posted in 14th Century, Conciliar Theory & Practice | Leave a comment

William Durandus the Younger (IV)

I read the constitutions for the state of the universal church which the holy fathers, general and provincial councils, and others carefully established once upon a time, which we have abandoned in many ways, and I decided to write down … Continue reading

Posted in 14th Century, Conciliar Theory & Practice | Leave a comment

William Durandus the Younger (III)

The context for William Durandus the Younger’s conciliarist thought was a complicated matrix of conflicting feudal claims (royal, noble, and episcopal) which were argued about, and sometimes fought over, for nearly 150 years prior to his time. The key conceptual … Continue reading

Posted in 14th Century, Conciliar Theory & Practice | Leave a comment

William Durandus the Younger (II)

As noted earlier, William Durandus the Younger played a pivotal role in the development of conciliarist thought. By interesting contrast, William’s uncle, William Durandus the Elder (1230-1296), also known as “The Speculator” because of his vast legal knowledge, appears to … Continue reading

Posted in 14th Century, Conciliar Theory & Practice | Leave a comment

William Durandus the Younger (I)

William Durandus the Younger was apparently one of the first to introduce into public debate a key phrase of reforming parties throughout the later Middle Ages: the reform of the Church “in head and members” (in capite et membris). Specifically, … Continue reading

Posted in 14th Century, Conciliar Theory & Practice | Leave a comment

Intro to William Durandus the Younger

William Durandus the Younger was an early 14th century conciliarist who seems to have occupied a rather interesting middle ground between radical conciliarism and its enemy radical papalism. That is, though a conciliarist in terms of wishing the pope’s authority … Continue reading

Posted in 14th Century, Conciliar Theory & Practice | Leave a comment