Category Archives: Conciliar Theory & Practice

“Those Who Demand A Reformation Should Accept The Council That Will Be Held”

In line with the work I’ve done here regarding Luther, here’s a huge proof, this time from John Calvin’s pen, that the Reformation was deeply indebted to Medieval conciliarism and on the issue of authority in the Church was not … Continue reading

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Railing in Vain…and Reaping the Whirlwind

Those of you who are familiar with my work here on conciliarism and its relationship to the Protestant Reformation will appreciate this observation from one of the leading Catholic scholars of conciliarism, Francis Oakley: …During the late fifteenth and early … Continue reading

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Thomas More A Conciliarist (?)

A post with this title coming right after the post titled “Marsilius of Padua Not A Conciliarist (?)” is a bit humorous, but the subject matter is dead serious. Reading in the same Francis Oakley article I cited in the … Continue reading

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Marsilius of Padua Not a Conciliarist (?)

Roman Catholic controversialists of the kind who are immoderately attached to a monistic understanding of papal authority have long maintained that the conciliarism of the 15th century had some of its most significant roots in the radical “secularist” politics of … Continue reading

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Reformation and Conciliarism: A Rejoinder to Pastor Lee

Lee, a pastor in South Dakota, respectfully dissents from my thesis that the Reformation was in significant ways a child of the Conciliar tradition. I have a few hopefully equally respectful rejoinders for him. Pastor Lee (I’m not sure what … Continue reading

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The Council of Constance (1414-1418)

In many ways one of the most important events of the later Middle Ages, the Council of Constance stands as a theoretical and experiential watershed in the history of Christian debates about the nature, functions, and limits of authority. It … Continue reading

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The Council of Pisa (1409)

The Western Schism was just celebrating its thirtieth year of ripping the <em>societas Christiana</em> apart when the Council of Pisa met in the year of the Lord’s incarnation 1409 for the purpose of ending it and restoring unity and peace. … Continue reading

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Some Changes In And Influences Of 15th Century Conciliarist Thought

A.J. Black, one of the foremost scholars in recent years on the conciliarism of the Council of Basel, writes that the terms “conciliar movement” and “conciliarism” are misleading “if we take them to imply that developments of ecclesiastical theory and … Continue reading

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Conciliar Radicalism

Joseph Gill summarizes the trouble with the later phases of the Council of Basel: …The Conciliarists, particularly those of Basel who carried the theory to its utmost limits in order to affirm that a council is by Christ’s ordinance the … Continue reading

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The Operation Was A Success, But the Patient Died

Joseph Gill, S.J., a “high” papalist who is, accordingly, not always quite fair in his criticisms of the Conciliar Movement, offers this excellent summary of what went wrong at the Council of Basel as it increasingly sought to curtail the … Continue reading

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