Category Archives: Biblical Interpretation

Qualifying Negative Appraisals of Antiochene Exegesis

Bertrand de Margerie, S.J., asks whether it is fair, when evaluating the Antiochene school of biblical exegesis, to reduce it to the oft-suspiciously viewed work of Theodore of Mopsuestia and Diodore of Tarsus.:”(An Introduction to the History of Exegesis Vol. … Continue reading

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Qualifying Negative Appraisals of Antiochene Exegesis

Bertrand de Margerie, S.J., asks whether it is fair, when evaluating the Antiochene school of biblical exegesis, to reduce it to the oft-suspiciously viewed work of Theodore of Mopsuestia and Diodore of Tarsus.:”(An Introduction to the History of Exegesis Vol. … Continue reading

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Antioch and Alexandria, Again

A key difference between the Antiochene and Alexandrian schools of biblical exegesis seems to have been that Antioch was more influenced by the discipline of rhetoric and a sense of rooted-ness in history, while Alexandria preferred philosophy and spiritual realities … Continue reading

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Believe in Order to Understand (I)

St. Anselm follows many of the Church Fathers in urging that an obstinate heretic should not be replied to with Scripture, for his heresy proves that he either does not believe Scripture or else interprets it perversely.:”(“The Incarnation of the … Continue reading

Posted in 11th Century, Biblical Interpretation, Faith and Reason | 1 Comment

Literal and Spiritual (II)

Antiochene exegete Diodore of Tarsus on how the literal meaning of Scripture does not exclude a higher meaning, but provides the necessary foundation for such: We do not object to anagoge [a search for higher meaning] and a more lofty … Continue reading

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Literal and Spiritual (I)

Francis M. Young helpfully delineates the hermeneutical assumptions of the Greco-Roman schools of grammar, rhetoric, and logic within which the Church Fathers received their formative educations.:”(“Alexandrian and Antiochene Exegesis,” in A History of Biblical Interpretation, Vol. 1: The Ancient Period, … Continue reading

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Literal and Spiritual

Francis M. Young helpfully delineates the hermeneutical assumptions of the Greco-Roman schools of grammar, rhetoric, and logic within which the Church Fathers received their formative educations.:”(“Alexandrian and Antiochene Exegesis,” in A History of Biblical Interpretation, Vol. 1: The Ancient Period, … Continue reading

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Christological Exegesis

To my knowledge, Augustine never mentions St. John 1:18 in the De Doctrina Christiana.  Nevertheless, it seems to me that this verse could serve as an apt subtitle for a work setting forth praecepta quaedam ractandarum Scripturarum, or principles of … Continue reading

Posted in Biblical Interpretation | 1 Comment

One Bible; Two Christological Schools

As others have pointed out regarding the multiplicity of theories of the atonement, the biblical content is so rich that it often allows for entirely different starting points on the same subject, which then entails the development of different theoretical … Continue reading

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Schleiermacher and Modern Hermeneutics

After a century and a half (1650-1800) of increasing rationalism in biblical hermeneutics and criticism, a reaction that may be called “romanticism” began. Lessing and Reimarus had succumbed to Spinoza, and had subsequently done incalculable damage to the cause of … Continue reading

Posted in 19th Century, Biblical Interpretation, Romantic Hermeneutics | Leave a comment