Category Archives: Ancient Rome

Political Pluralism / Polytheism

In a comment on Doug Wilson’s blog, a “Mister Ed” cited Gary North’s book The Myth of Pluralism in response to another commenter’s questions about the Founding Fathers in relation to contemporary American political thought. I haven’t read the North … Continue reading

Posted in Ancient Greece, Ancient Rome, Christianity and Classical Culture | 4 Comments

Post-Constitutional Rule

My politics professor suggests that the definition of a society that has given up on its constitution and adopted some other form of rule (even perhaps while retaining an outward show of loyalty to the constitution) is the rule of … Continue reading

Posted in Ancient Rome | Leave a comment

Doctors for the State

This is simply fascinating. Plutarch describes both the Spartan reformer Lycurgus and the Roman revolutionist Julius Caesar with the term “physician.” Compare: Things being in this posture at his return, [Lycurgus] applied himself, without loss of time, to a thorough … Continue reading

Posted in Ancient Greece, Ancient Rome | Leave a comment

Divinized Politics (Augustine on Images, II)

In the entry below “Augustine and Images,” I mentioned that Augustine’s City of God “de-divinizes” politics. This is a such a fascinating thought that I wanted to give it its own post, especially in light of a certain error of … Continue reading

Posted in Ancient Rome, Christianity and Classical Culture, St. Augustine | Leave a comment

Religion and Civil Order

You often hear educated unbelievers claiming that religion is nothing more than a social tool used by those who hold power to keep the uneducated in line. While it’s tempting apologetically speaking to go off on that suggestion, it may … Continue reading

Posted in Ancient Rome, St. Augustine | Leave a comment

Having the Name Without the Reality

Augustine cites Cicero on the destruction of the Roman Republic via the decline of traditional morality. There are some interesting parallels with modern America, to be sure: …the great leaders could not have founded, or could not have so long … Continue reading

Posted in Ancient Rome, St. Augustine | Leave a comment

Inviolable Authority…Until You Abuse It

The office of tribune in the ancient Roman Republic had been instituted to function as an inviolable guardian of the people. The person of the tribune was considered sacrosanct; he could not be removed from office or hindered in any … Continue reading

Posted in Ancient Rome | Leave a comment

Sound Familiar?

“…So Numa forbade the Romans to represent God in the form of man or beast, nor was there any painted or graven image of a deity admitted amongst them for the space of the first hundred and seventy years, all … Continue reading

Posted in Ancient Rome, The Ancient World | Leave a comment

Cicero on Friendship

In the person of Laelius, Cicero speaks of friendship this way: “there is nothing which so fits in with our nature, or is so exactly what we want in prosperity or adversity.”:”(“On Friendship,” in Treatises On Friendship and Old Age, … Continue reading

Posted in Ancient Rome | Leave a comment

Chill Out

In Ecclesiastes 12:12, Solomon says, “Be warned, my son, of anything in addition to them. Of making many books there is no end, and much study wearies the body.” The Roman Stoic philosopher Seneca (ca. 4 B.C. to A.D. 65) … Continue reading

Posted in Ancient Rome, Stoicism - Roman | Leave a comment